About your Search

20121128
20121206
STATION
KQED (PBS) 38
LANGUAGE
English 38
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)
newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: washington's struggle to avoid going off the "fiscal cliff" resumed in earnest today. the president moved to draw on his reelection victory for new clout with congress. the goal: a sweeping deficit agreement to avert $650 billion in spending cuts and tax increases at the start of 2013. from the white house came word that president obama will try to build public pressure on congress to raise taxes on the wealthy and prevent tax hikes for everyone else. white house spokesman jay carney. >> well, the president believes very strongly that the american people matter in this debate. because this debate is about t
, tonight's market monitor guest says stock prices and the economy will grow in 2013. hank smith of haverford trust joins us. >> tom: super storm sandy keeps showing up in some economic data. this time: consumer spending. spending fell 0.2% in october. it was expected to be up that much. stocks were mixed with continued nervousness about the fiscal cliff. the dow gained just three points, the nasdaq lost nearly two. the s&p 500 was virtually unchanged. on the week, the dow up just barely. the nasdaq the biggest gainer: up almost 1.5%, the s&p up half a percentage point. >> susie: investors took a bite out of yum brands today. the stock tumbled 10% after the parent of k.f.c. and pizza hut said its business in china is slowing. yum's c.e.o. warned that china sales will fall by 4% in the fourth quarter, that's a big drop from the same period a year ago when sales surged 21%. blaming the weak chinese economy, yum also said it plans to reduce the number of restaurant openings in the asian nation. yum operates roughly 5,000 restaurants in china, accounting for half of its total sales.
from us, depending on congress, to follow. that is a boost to his economy. again, he has to show results on the ground. he has to do two different things. show his government is legitimate to. and he has to show he can build jobs and clean up the trash and produce safety and the streets. >> there has been some successes as well. thank you for coming in. now to the mystery in the west bank, the body of yasser arafat was exhumed a few hours ago so the scientists can find out if the leader was poisoned to death. the move follows a documentary which reported that traces of the radioactive elements polonium had been found on his clothing. eight years after his death, what could this investigation uncovered? we have this report. >> it looks down from billboards and posters. the man who dominance -- dominated politics for decades. revered by most and reviled by many israelis, yasir arafat died in 2004 after falling suddenly and violently ill. eight years later, and beyond prying eyes, his tomb was opened and samples of his remains were removed. all of this after a tv documentary said it
put it in perspective say it going to be a tough economy for the next decade is there anything this there fiscal cliff negotiations that there would be a package for jobs or helping the economy over the next couple of years in the near term? >> well, one would hope so my own belief is there should be significant investment in roads, bridges, airports, schools, other infrastructure for this country because we not only have a fiscal deficit we also have an infrastructure deficit. that would give two advantages. one, it would employ people in this country at a time when unemployment is too high. and number two it would improve the competive position of the country so, that's a to-for. >> susie: senator conrad, thank you for coming to the program. we appreciate it. >> thank you, always good to be with you. >> reporter: i'm erika miller in new york. still ahead, we'll look at why silver has been one of the best performing asset classes this year. >> tom: the u.s. economy was hotter than first thought this summer. in the newest data on the gross domestic product, the economy grew in
that is deprived of its volatility, the system becomes very fragile. just like the economy became fragile by micromanaging. >> let me use that to segue into the text. this book -- define for me "antifragile." >> what is the opposite of fragile? they tend to say robust, solid. the opposite of fragile is something that gains from disorder. i was an options trader for a long time, half of my life. i had a name for things that were harmed by volatility. i realized that you can map fragility as something that gains from volatility. things that gain from volatility, we have to have a name different from resilience. i call them "antifragile." people make mistakes shooting for robustness and stability, things that need -- you go to the gym. people work out. they stress their body and their body gets stronger from stress. it is the same thing with your bones. the same thing applies to economic life. anything organic requires some dose of variability. fixing things is not a good idea. we have departed from the enlightenment of this notion of vieing economic life as something again into thinking tha
the markets but there are also fundamentals going on as well. we got mixed reports on the economy. tom just talked about that weak data showing businesses contracting. and we're also getting warnings on weak corporate profits. so doesn't this give you pause about buying in this market right now? >> i think, i just got back from two weeks in europe speaking to portfolio managers in seven different countries. they are profoundly underinvestmented in the u.s. the endowment funds in this country are profoundly underinvested in u.s. equities. a lot of portfolio managers are hoping equities go down as measured by the s&p so their underperformance doesn't look as bad. if the market doesn't go down here i think they will be forced to chase not end of the year. >> susie: uh-huh. beyond stocks, give us your thoughts on bonds, on gold, and other commodities. >> i think gold is in a secular bull market. i think it's just been consolidating the big run it has had and will eventually go higher. bons i think with the re-election of president obama it pretty much insurances you will have low-interest rates
state's economy? >> well, across the country, i think this whole issue around taxes and around the fiscal cliff generally leads to something else, which is significant uncertainty. and whether it is delaware or whether it is any other state, one of the things that is most important to us is having business leaders have some kind of certainty about what the ground rules are going to be. not just for the next three months, by the way. but really for the next several years. they're more likely to invest, more likely to hire their next employee if they know what the game looks like. what the landscape looks like. and so as much as anything else, we think having that certainty, having that clarity on taxes and spending, is really important. >> susie: you said you are also very concerned about where growth is going to come from. did you discuss that with the president, won did he say, aside from tax increases and spending cuts? >> one of the things we specifically talked about was infrastructure. it didn't used to be that roads and bridges were democrat or republican. we need to cont
economy. >> they could play havoc with the world economy. i think you would see a wave of terror across the region, potentially even here at home. i don't think, just for your personal, as per personal opinion, i don't think they would try to block the persian gulf because that would cut their own throats, but i would not be surprised to see them attack the oil facilities of other countries on the periphery of the gulf. and to do other things that would drive the price of oil through the roof but i think -- and i think you would see them behave in a very different way in both iraq and afghanistan. >> rose: based on everything you know, do you believe that they will respond to the economic embargo, the economic sanctions if we turn that screw as hard as we possibly can? >> i don't think the government will, if there is one thing that the iranians, saddam hussein, the north koreans and bashar al-assad all have in common is they don't care how many other people get killed. >> rose: even their own people? >> it is what happens to them that matters. so the question is, do those, can the sanc
businesses. >> going over the fiscal cliff will hurt our economy and hurt job creation in our country. this is not good for our country. it's as simple as that, and the president understands it. >> reporter: corporate leaders were also making the rounds. a group from the simpson/bowles backed organization "fix the debt" stopped in for talks on capitol hill. and later, c.e.o.s from yahoo, archers daniel midlands, caterpillar and other companies headed to the white house for a meeting with the president. >> i'd like to hear the president's views about where the country is headed and support him any way we can. >> reporter: treasury secretary timothy geithner will meet with congressional leaders tomorrow, so there is hope serious face- to-face negotiations will soon be under way. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> susie: one of the c.e.o.s meeting with lawmakers today joins us. he is david cote, c.e.o. of honeywell. david, thank you so much for joining us. we really appreciate it. did you get the sense from house speaker boehner, he is ready to make a deal? >> i would say there is a
has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: neither side showed signs of budging today as the nation edged closer toward a so- called fiscal cliff that could raise taxes by year's end. we begin with a report from newshour congressional correspondent kwame holman. >> we're going to have to see the rates on the top two percent go up. we're not going to be able to get a deal without it. >> reporter: in his first interview since the election, president obama rejected a proposal from house speaker john boehner. he spoke on bloomberg television. >> unfortunately the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. i'm happy to entertain other ideas that the
on its feet, it involves finding a way to help greece's economy actually return to growth. while some of the terms of the deals were a little more favorable than many had feared, at the end of the day, you have to find a way to help these economies grow. that probably means pausing some of that austerity. >> susie: you talk about it being a favorable deal, and you picture that other troubled companies in europe are saying, i want a deal just like greece got. what does that mean for the european economic recovery? >> i think it certainly complicates things a little bit. there is clearly an issue of moral hazard. many other countries may look to the deal that greece got and say, hey, maybe i can get a similar-type deal. in the end, when we think about what is plaguing personal europe, a lot of it has to do with austerity which has been forced on the economies, which are really, really depressed, and pushes them deeper into the hole. part of what needs to be done moving forward is pausing some of that austerity. you can't go to a country in a very bad recession, and tell them to increase
, which will be one where the egyptians will be able to take control of their economy much more so than before. it tells you that the egyptians feel they own the country, and that is very important. >> what do you say of the critique that if you can simply replaced one ferro with another? >> i would say it is not that -- one ferro -- pharoah with another? >> i would say it is not that bad. in the old days under a pharoah there would be no protests in the street. today, people feel empowered to control their destinies. >> even if people are demonstrating for a better future, where will the jobs come from? but i am one that believes the egyptian economy has been repressed for a long time. with proper management and an inclusive growth model, as opposed to one that just serves special interests, and with help from outside, egypt can unleash its private-sector. if that materializes, then drops will materialize and party will go down. -- jobs will materialize and poverty will go down. it is a bumpy voyage, but possible. >> how can he do to fill the role of law, which is all important? -- ho
and international economies as well. can you reassure them that you will come to some sort of a deal? >> i think that we will. we're in the early stages of the serious negotiations and that president -- the president has put forth an offer and speaker john boehner has put forth that offer. the fact that this is rejected is to be expected but it is testing ground. we have seen that between them have gone through this process. i believe we will get there. both sides so that we cannot win are refusing to compromise. we both have our right to be here and we have countered with some revenue in places. we want to see what the president will do in terms of cuts. where are concerned about the deficit. i believe we will get there. i really do. >> you are a perennial optimist. you make everything seem sunny. we are at a stalemate. republicans do not want to raise taxes and democrats to know what to -- do not want to cut spending. >> the president has the political upper hand. if nothing happens, the tax rates do expire as is and they go up and the sequestration of takes place. he can vote -- publicly blam
the house of commons from the british economy -- on the british economy, he had to read mcvet is taking much longer than in must got to balance -- he had to admit it is taking much habrÉ than it osborn when o address was first thought to balance the nation's books. >> the people want to know that we are making progress, and the message today is that we are making progress. it is a hard road, but we are getting there. >> he pointed to the economic problems globally that are making his job harder. as a result, the chancellor announced austerity would have to last for logger, until 2018, in fact. that means more benefits will now be squeezed, and there will be a tax rates on the pension pops. >> i know these tax measures willthought to balance not be r. ways to reduce the deficit never are. but we must act together. when you look for savings, it is fair to local to the 1%. >> with multiple forecasts being downgraded, it has now become an issue about competence. they argue not only has the chancellor failed, but failed on his own terms. >> it has been completely derailed. the one test they set
economy and making sure that local made in america jobs are going to be coming to our district, i think we're ready to do that. >> you know, the person you defeated, pete stark, was somewhat erratic in the campaign, and i'm wondering, you know, how your relationship with him is now. has he talked with you since you've been back there, or has he pretty much moved on and have you moved on as well? >> you know, we reached out and attempted to contact him but did not have any success, and he has not called us, but that's okay. i know our offices are communicating to each other through various staff members because we want to be ready on day one. because there are so many constituent services that will need to be provided, so our office is working with his office to make sure it's a seamless handoff and the voters won't know the difference in what the casework is when we start on january 30 and we'll be ready. >> what about the issues? you're a democrat, he's a democrat, a very liberal democrat. how do you find yourself different from him not just in terms of demeanor or behavior but on the iss
animals that are so important to our economy and for the environment. they depend upon the coral growth and coral reef and if you have that much of a loss it really has a cascading negative impact. >> sreenivasan: florida is no stranger to storms, and healthy reefs buffer up to 90% of the force of incoming waves providing shoreline protection to people and property from storm surge and erosion. then there's the dollars and cents. more than 33,000 jobs in the florida keys alone are supported by ocean recreation and tourism which accounts for 58% of the local economy and an average $2.3 billion a year. >> it is the lifeblood of our economy in the keys. we get millions of visitors a year who spend millions of hours out on the ocean diving and fishing on our coral reefs. >> sreenivasan: amy slates dive resort depends on coral, and the divers who come to see them >> because we deal so much with nature and with diving its it's probably life or death for my business, i hate to say it, but if the coral reefs thrive and grow, the more wildlife you have and the nicer it will be for everyone. and
cole. >> you're not going to grow the economy if you raise tax rates on the top two rates. it'll hurt small businesses, it'll hurt our economy, it's why it's not the right approach. we're willing to put revenue on the table as long as we're not raising rates. >> brown: despite the president's talk of changing minds, "politico's" manu raju says that privately, house republicans think they can win this fight. >> right now the republican leadership feels pretty confident that they have most of their folks in line. they all generally support keeping tax rates low for virtually for every single income group. they do not want to see incomes increase for that top tax bracket. >> brown: meanwhile, on the senate floor, minority leader mitch mcconnell criticized democrats for putting social security off limits in any deficit deal. >> as for social security, the only thing we hear from why in the world wouldn't they want to talk about the fact that this vital program started spending out more than it took in 2010, for the first time in nearly 30 years and that its trustees now estimate that it w
. >> wherever our trades negotiation the economy comes to life. norfolk-suffolk, one line, infinite possibilities. >> additional corporate funding is provided by boeing. additional funding is provided by the anenburg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. perhaps you took a break for the holidays. perhaps you gave thanks that the election was ofrlte then you dialed back in this week and discovered, no, we have apparently just entered a new phase in a political year that never ended. two big stories this week -- the impending fiscal cliff and the washington debates over who will succeed hillary clinton as secretary of state. first to the fiscal cliff. at the end of the year the buescher ra tax cuts will expire and the first wave of $1.2 trillion in spending cuts is scheduled to kick in. c.e.o.'s and economists alike are worried this will send the economy spiraling back into recession. the solution, $1. trillion in new reve
on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the battle for control of syria reached ever closer to the capital today. heavy fighting flared near the damascus airport, and online access was cut, as the pressure intensified on president bashar al-assad. we have a report narrated by jonathan rugman of "independent television news." >> reporter: it could be the west's worst nightmare. jubilant jihadist fighters near damascus. this group has captured a helicopter and these islamists are now in the vanguard of syria's rebel army. syrian warplanes and helicopters were filmed attacking the fringes of the capit
with is good, if it is fair and just, and moves the countries economy, and starts declining the deficit then it's good. and the process will have worked. if it isn't, then we can revisit the process and say the process was flawed. >> the process getting there is the hard part. we could all in our heads draw up a deal but he has had people over the last couple of weeks, republicans taking risk. boehner took a risk, tom cole took a risk and he undercut them. he made them look stupid with what he did yesterday. they feel furious, they feel burned so you have to help your people along. you have to make it more possible. and so that's why i think you just got to what he offered was not only a balanced deal that would be fine if he offered something balance, he offered something even worse from the republican point of view than what he had offered a couple years ago. so he started with drawing things off the tab and it seemed like chest beats. >> we just went through an election, david. the republicans are the ones who are for medicare kurkts they really are. so what he is basically saying is okay th
ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: house republicans today offered their counter- offer to the president's plan for a deal both sides say is needed to avoid year-end tax increases. the move was the latest volley in an increasingly tense face- off between the two branches of government. >> with 28 days left to come to a deal on the nation's fiscal cliff, the white house is holding firm on its proposal to raise taxes on the wealthy. spokesman jay carney. >> the obstacle remains at this point the refusal to acknowledge by republican leaders that there is no deal that achieves the kind of balance
new prison constructions occurred in white rural communities who come to believe that their economies depend on prisons. private prison companies are listed on the new york stock exchange. thes is has become so equally rooted in our political structure that it's not going to fade away or downsize without a major upheaval, a demand on the part of the public. >> i want to challenge one thing. she knows everything-- the one thing i would differ slightly that one million in the criminal justice system would lose their job. they would? >lose the job they have today but they could move laterally to a job in treatment. i see prison guards i speak to all the time and i say i want to reform the system but i don't have it out for your job. in a treatment universe, many people like you are needed. you have been working with addicts for years. but i would like to propose to you you get a job in a new industry where you can be proud of. when you have bring your kid to work day-- i was in a prison on oklahoma on bring your kid to work day. wouldn't you like to be proud to tell where you of your chi
the economy. >> narrator: by 2008, corzine had become a trusted advisor to barack obama. it was once rumored that he might even replace tim geithner as treasury secretary. >> here we go, folks. >> narrator: but then in 2010, new jersey voters ended his political career and returned him to wall street. >> former new jersey governor jon corzine is returning to the private sector. he has taken the helm of mf global. >> narrator: but corzine's choice of mf global was puzzling. >> i think it was a little surprising that he went to such a small firm. you know, if you think about it, goldman partner, goldman ceo, confidante of the president of the united states, former new jersey governor, senator. why wasn't he running a bigger firm, i guess, is the real question. >> 99% of people would look at his résumé and say, "i was a senior partner at goldman sachs, i was the governor of new jersey, i'm past 60, over and out, i'm going to go have fun." but he looks at his résumé and says, "i was kicked out of goldman sachs. i was kicked out of being the governor. i still have something to prove." >> and
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)